Forum: Kiadis Pharma » Kiadis Pharma juli 2019 » Pagina: 88 | Eurobench.com

Kiadis Pharma juli 2019

2.632 Posts, Pagina: « 1 2 3 4 5 6 ... 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 ... 128 129 130 131 132 » | Laatste
Aantal posts per pagina:  20 50 100 | Omlaag ↓
Endless
0
The final cataclysm, in this Biblical array of plagues, happened when white blood cells produced by the donor’s marrow mounted a vigorous immune response to the patient’s body. This phenomenon—called graft-versus-host disease—was sometimes a passing storm, and sometimes a chronic condition; either way, it turned the logic of immunology upside down. Typically, when foreign tissue is transplanted into a body, the fear is that the patient might reject it. But in these bone-marrow-graft cases it’s the transplant that rejects the patient. The immune cells of the bone-marrow donor—a mutinous crew forced onto an unfamiliar ship—recognize the body around them as foreign. Virtually every major organ system can fall under attack. In some cases, the disease proved fatal; in others, clinicians found ways to manage it with drugs.

In the late nineteen-seventies, Appelbaum and his colleagues analyzed the results of allogeneic transplants for leukemia, and found yet another surprise: the patients who had experienced graft-versus-host disease in its chronic form were also the ones whose cancers were least likely to relapse. The imported immune cells were effectively targeting residual cancer cells in the host. What Thomas had achieved with Lowry was akin to a regular organ transplant. (In 1954, in Boston, Joseph Murray had performed the first successful kidney transplant, also between twins.) But the phenomenon observed by doctors at the Hutch suggested that marrow grafts represented a very different kind of medical intervention.
Endless
0
From the start, those findings mesmerized the world of cell therapy. They showed that the human immune system—in particular, the T cell, a type of white blood cell that is central to what is known as “adaptive immunity”—could recognize and attack cancer. Which led to a question: Could T cells be trained to reject cancerous cells but not turn against the host? Could they be the basis of a new class of drug?

At this point, a larger question arises: What is a drug, anyway? A therapeutic substance, you might say. But does it have to be a molecule in its pure form, like aspirin or penicillin? Can it be a mixture of active ingredients—like cough syrup? A toxicologist might quarrel with the notion that certain substances are inherently therapeutic: water is a drug at one dose and a poison at another. Most chemotherapies are poisons even at the correct dose. Galen, the Greco-Roman physician of the second century, argued that all human pathology could be conceptualized as imbalances of humors—black bile, yellow bile, blood, and phlegm. Could a humor, drawn from a patient’s body, qualify as a drug?

For most of the twentieth century, the definition of a drug was simple, because drugs were simple: they were typically small molecules synthesized in factories or extracted from plants, purified, and packaged into pills. Later, the pharmacopoeia expanded to include large and complex proteins—from insulin to monoclonal antibodies. But could a living substance be a drug?

Thomas, who saw bone-marrow transplantation as a procedure or a protocol, akin to other organ transplants, would never have described it as a drug. And yet, in ways that Thomas couldn’t have anticipated, he had laid the foundation for a new kind of therapy—“living drugs,” a sort of chimera of the pharmaceutical and the procedural—which would confound definitions and challenge the boundaries of medicine, raising basic questions about the patenting, the manufacturing, and the pricing of medicines.
Endless
0
In 1971, while Don Thomas was performing his first allogeneic transplants in Seattle, an eighteen-year-old high-school senior from the Bay Area named Carl June received news of his draft lottery. He had drawn the number fifty; deployment was virtually certain. So he turned down admission offers from Caltech and Stanford, and, as he likes to say, chose “the Naval Academy over the paddy fields of Vietnam.” June, who is rail-thin and lanky, with the physique of a long jumper, recalls his years at the academy with the ruefulness of an athlete forced to wait on the sidelines. After the Navy paid his way through medical school, at Baylor College, in Houston, he arrived at the Hutchinson Center, where he spent three years in the early nineteen-eighties as an oncology fellow, studying marrow transplants in Thomas’s research program. He was joining a high-powered group that included a tall, German-born rowing fanatic named Rainer Storb, who focussed on tissue typing and transplant therapy; a diminutive, Siberian-born soccer enthusiast named Alex Fefer, who had shown that immune systems could turn against tumors in mice; and Thomas’s wife, Dottie, who ran the day-to-day affairs of the lab and the clinic, and whom everyone called “the mother of bone-marrow transplantation.”

June became fascinated by early experiments in transferring T cells, but then spent a decade at the Naval Medical Research Institute, in Bethesda, studying infectious diseases, such as malaria and, later, H.I.V. Finally, in 1999, he moved his lab to the University of Pennsylvania. His personal life, meanwhile, was crosshatched with tragedy: in 1995, his wife, Cindy, was diagnosed with ovarian cancer, and she died six years later. Throughout these years—and especially after Cindy’s diagnosis—June kept imagining a new paradigm for cancer treatment, in which living immune cells, rather than drugs, would be mobilized against the disease.

Mature T cells normally come armed with proteins on their surface—called T-cell receptors—which allow them to recognize matching bits of foreign proteins that might be present on the surface of their target cells, such as human cells infected by a virus. These receptors are notably selective: they trigger only when a cell has mounted a protein fragment on its surface and “presented” it to the T cell in the context of certain other proteins—as if they can see a picture only when the frame is right.

Unlike antibodies—Y-shaped proteins that bind like Velcro to a wide range of targets, including free-floating viruses and proteins—T-cell receptors bind to their targets somewhat loosely. The T cell can thus inspect the surface of a cell, alert others, and move on, like a drug-sniffing dog at a security checkpoint, going from one suitcase to another, summoning help where necessary.

For decades, immunologists had reasoned that the T-cell surveillance system might be able to detect and kill cancer cells. But, unlike infected cells, cancerous ones tend to be so genetically similar to normal cells, with such a similar repertoire of proteins, that they’re hard for even T cells to pick out of a crowd. A cancer-specific T-cell response could arise only if a gene were mutated or incorrectly regulated in cancer, and if the protein encoded by that gene were fragmented in the right way, and if the fragments were channelled into the cell’s system for T-cell detection, and if there were a waiting T cell equipped to sense it as foreign: a graveyard of ifs.

June knew that two researchers at the Hutch—Stanley Riddell, an animated figure with blocky glasses and a mechanical pencil habitually clipped to his shirt pocket, and Philip Greenberg, a man with a dense shag of hair that he had kept since the sixties—had begun to identify T cells that could recognize cytomegalovirus (a major threat to immunocompromised patients), grow those cells in flasks, and transfuse the increased population of the cells into bone-marrow recipients. In Houston, Malcolm Brenner, Cliona Rooney, and Helen Heslop had done something similar with T cells that targeted tumor cells infected by another pathogen, Epstein-Barr virus. And at the National Cancer Institute, in Bethesda, a surgical oncologist named Steven Rosenberg tried yet another strategy: he drew native T cells out of malignant tumors, such as melanomas, positing that immune cells that had infiltrated a tumor must have the capacity to recognize and attack the tumor. Rosenberg’s team grew these tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, expanding their numbers by a few orders of magnitude, and transferred them back into patients.
sandman70
0
quote:

Drs P. schreef op 18 juli 2019 09:25:


KIjk eens aan 4,xx zoals voorspelt..


Ja ben blij dat ik een stop loss gehanteerd heb met klein verlies.
Blijft altijd link deze bedrijven.
RestoPan
0
www.contractpharma.com/contents/view_...

CytoSen genereert zo te lezen al cash uit een samenwerking met KBI, productie en verkoop van een product vanaf "first half of 2019" uit een bestaand samenwerkingsverband.
Chiddix
0
quote:

Drs P. schreef op 18 juli 2019 09:25:


KIjk eens aan 4,xx zoals voorspelt..


Eerst het zuur, dan het zoet.
KaPeeN63
0
Waar blijft Jefferies met zijn nieuwe advies.
Jefferies pretendeert toch de "expert" te zijn wanneer het gaat om pharma gerelateerde bedrijven?
Elvisfan
0
quote:

KaPeeN63 schreef op 18 juli 2019 09:42:


Waar blijft Jefferies met zijn nieuwe advies.
Jefferies pretendeert toch de "expert" te zijn wanneer het gaat om pharma gerelateerde bedrijven?


tja, die wachten mss af om een koersdoel van 4 te 'voorspellen'
Hoop....
0
Gisteren speculatief koopadvies op basis van TA, kiadis moest dan niet onder de 5.20 zakken nu door het putje???
RestoPan
0
quote:

KaPeeN63 schreef op 18 juli 2019 09:42:


Waar blijft Jefferies met zijn nieuwe advies.
Jefferies pretendeert toch de "expert" te zijn wanneer het gaat om pharma gerelateerde bedrijven?


Jefferies kan ook niets beginnen voordat de SAG-uitkomst er is, zal wel in oktober of november met een nieuw advies komen. We zitten nu in niemandsland, een Gaza-strook.
DWB Happy
0
quote:

Roze bril schreef op 18 juli 2019 09:30:


[...]
Op de aangepaste company presentation houdt Kiadis het nog altijd op 2020. Analysten die hun visie verkondigen moet je steeds met een korrel zout nemen. Waar heb ik dat nog ergens gelezen?


Ik geloof niet dat jij helemaal de impact van dit probleem begrijpt.

Op dit moment is het voor Kiadis van zeer groot belang dat koers niet verder onderuit gaat.

Dat 2 verschillende analisten met dezelfde conclusie komen is vreemd, maar wat nog vreemder is, is dat Kiadis niet ingrijpt, ingrijpt om de verdere aftakeling van het aandeel te voorkomen.

Het feit dat ze niet ingrijpen versterkt alleen maar de de gedachte dat de analisten
het bij het rechte eind hebben, waardoor de koersdruk juist niet zal afnemen.

Lagere koers, lagere emissieprijs, des te groter de verwatering.

Alex69
0
Ik kijk er niet raar van op als achteraf blijkt dat de 4,98 van vanochtend de all time low is geweest. We gaan het zien..
KaPeeN63
0
quote:

DWB Happy schreef op 18 juli 2019 09:49:


[...]

Ik geloof niet dat jij helemaal de impact van dit probleem begrijpt.

Op dit moment is het voor Kiadis van zeer groot belang dat koers niet verder onderuit gaat.

Dat 2 verschillende analisten met dezelfde conclusie komen is vreemd, maar wat nog vreemder is, is dat Kiadis niet ingrijpt, ingrijpt om de verdere aftakeling van het aandeel te voorkomen.

Het feit dat ze niet ingrijpen versterkt alleen maar de de gedachte dat de analisten
het bij het rechte eind hebben, waardoor de koersdruk juist niet zal afnemen.

Lagere koers, lagere emissieprijs, des te groter de verwatering.




Ja, kijk maar eens naar Pharming, ruim 650 miljoen openstaande aandelen.
DWB Happy
0
quote:

KaPeeN63 schreef op 18 juli 2019 09:51:


[...]

Ja, kijk maar eens naar Pharming, ruim 650 miljoen openstaande aandelen.


Een nieuwe mosselsoort?
KaPeeN63
0
Bij Kiadis (volgens mij) totaal uitstaande aandelen 29.560.000 stuks
waarvan 16.610.000 stuks Free float.
BlijvenHopen
0
quote:

Alex69 schreef op 18 juli 2019 09:51:


Ik kijk er niet raar van op als achteraf blijkt dat de 4,98 van vanochtend de all time low is geweest. We gaan het zien..



Never, er komen nog een aantal emissies en steeds op lagere niveaus. Als ze al een voorwaardelijke goedkeuring krijgen en vervolgens ook nog definitieve goedkeuring dan begint de echt verkoop pas ergens richting 2023.
Alex69
0
quote:

BlijvenHopen schreef op 18 juli 2019 09:56:


[...]


Never, er komen nog een aantal emissies en steeds op lagere niveaus. Als ze al een voorwaardelijke goedkeuring krijgen en vervolgens ook nog definitieve goedkeuring dan begint de echt verkoop pas ergens richting 2023.

Ik verwacht dat een emissie voorlopig niet aan de orde is. Ik denk eerder dat er een partner komt die een stevig belang gaat nemen in Kiadis in ruil voor een deel van de toekomstige opbrengsten.
poicephalus
0
quote:

BassieNL schreef op 17 juli 2019 20:10:


[...]Ik probeer het altijd logisch te beredeneren. Daarnaast ben ik niet onder de indruk van de kenners van KBC. Zij zaten er vorige keer grandioos naast.

SAG komt in september bij elkaar.
Ik denk niet dat het een jaar duurt voordat zij advies uitbreng.
Wel een paar maanden. Dan zal CAT/CHMP advies opvolgen.
En 2 maanden later EMA goedkeuring, indien het een positief advies is.
Dan de prijsonderhandelingen, om te beginnen met Duitsland.
Daarna volgt marktintroductie.

Als de eerste stap (SAG) positief uitpakt (-het kwartje kan 2 kanten opvallen-) wordt financiering gemakkelijker dan nu.



Dus bij positief resultaat (en gestegen koers) volgt een aandelen emissie (en dus een zakkende koers).
Kan ik het zo vertalen?
Roze bril
0
quote:

DWB Happy schreef op 18 juli 2019 09:49:


[...]

Ik geloof niet dat jij helemaal de impact van dit probleem begrijpt.

Op dit moment is het voor Kiadis van zeer groot belang dat koers niet verder onderuit gaat.

Dat 2 verschillende analisten met dezelfde conclusie komen is vreemd, maar wat nog vreemder is, is dat Kiadis niet ingrijpt, ingrijpt om de verdere aftakeling van het aandeel te voorkomen.

Het feit dat ze niet ingrijpen versterkt alleen maar de de gedachte dat de analisten
het bij het rechte eind hebben, waardoor de koersdruk juist niet zal afnemen.

Lagere koers, lagere emissieprijs, des te groter de verwatering.



En op welke manier denk je dat ze moeten ingrijpen?
Jij gaat er blijkbaar van uit dat ze een emissie moeten gaan doen vóór het CHMP advies. Ik ben daar niet van overtuigd.
2.632 Posts, Pagina: « 1 2 3 4 5 6 ... 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 ... 128 129 130 131 132 » | Laatste
Aantal posts per pagina:  20 50 100 | Omhoog ↑

Plaats een reactie

Meedoen aan de discussie?

Word nu gratis lid of log in met uw e-mailadres en wachtwoord.

Direct naar Forum

Detail

Vertraagd 19 feb 2020 15:59
Koers 1,825
Verschil -0,010 (-0,54%)
Hoog 1,840
Laag 1,810
Volume 42.122
Volume gemiddeld 643.206
Volume gisteren 181.442